High School Terms and Definitions

High School Terms and Definitions

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The four achievement categories are: Knowledge and Understanding, Thinking, Communication and Application.
The chart provides a reference point for all assessment practice and a framework within which to assess and evaluate student achievement.
Adjustments made in the delivery of course material, including specific, teaching and assessment strategies, and/or assistive technology, that support a student’s access to the subject or course materials, but do not change the learning expectations.
The process of gathering information/evidence that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a course.
This certificate will be granted to students who have earned a maximum of 13 credits.
Provides guidelines and expectations for all students regarding behaviour within the school. It is usually found in the student agenda or on the school website.
Students must complete 40 community involvement hours, at any time in secondary school, as part of their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) requirements.
This is a specific course students must take that fulfills part of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) requirements.
Provides students with an opportunity to extend their classroom learning with a work placement.
This six-character code describes the subject, grade level and stream or destination of a secondary school course
The process of selecting courses for the following school year. This occurs in January/February.
A credit value of 1.0 is granted upon successfully completing a 110-hour course with a minimum of 50%.
A record of marks and credits attempted and achieved, community involvement hours, and completion of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test requirement.
A Student Success initiative that provides students who have failed a course an opportunity to complete the required learning expectations and earn the credit. Students who withdraw from a course are not eligible for credit recovery.
A Student Success initiative that supports students at-risk of failing a course. Credit Rescue occurs while the student is enrolled in the course.
Students may be asking to complete a course culminating activity, which is a major project for each course. There are a variety of assessment practices that teachers may use to address the individual learning styles of all students.
Dual credit programs are ministry-approved programs that allow students, while they are still in secondary school, to take college or apprenticeship courses that count towards both the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) and a postsecondary certificate, diploma, degree or a Certificate of Apprenticeship.
Literacy Test: The literacy test is written in Grade 10. A student must pass the literacy requirement to earn the OSSD. The purpose of this test is to ensure that students have acquired the essential reading and writing skills that apply to all subject areas in and up to the end of Grade 9.

Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics: The Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics provides individual and system data on student knowledge and skills based on the curriculum expectations in Grade 9 applied and academic programs. All students in these programs are required to participate.

Students may write an exam, which tests their knowledge on the entire course work, at or near the end of the semester.
The Guidance office is a safe place for students to express their needs and concerns. Guidance Counsellors provide support services for many aspects of adolescent development including, personal, academic and career counselling. The Guidance office may also be referred to as ‘Student Services’ in some schools.
A committee that meets and decides if a student should be identified as an exceptional pupil and, if so, the placement that will best meet the student’s needs.
A written plan, which describes the strengths and needs of an individual student, the special education programs and services established to meet that student’s needs, and how the programs and services will be delivered.
Learning Skills are reported on the Ontario Provincial Report Card in the following areas: responsibility, independent work, organization, collaboration, initiative and self-regulation.
Adjustments made to the grade level expectations for a subject or course, to meet the needs of the student. Students are working at their own level and are assessed based on their Individual Education Plan rather than meeting course expectations.
Students will select 12 courses that are of specific interest to them and which will count towards the 30-credit OSSD requirement.
A student identification number assigned by the Ministry of Education when a student starts school in Ontario. The number will follow the student throughout his or her education in Ontario.
This certificate will be granted to students who have earned a minimum of 14 credits.
The OSSD is granted to students who achieve the requirements of 30 credits (18 compulsory and 12 elective), complete 40 Community Involvement hours, successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy requirement.
In Grade 10 students write their OSSLT as a required component of an OSSD.
The official school record for each student enrolled in an Ontario school. The OSR file contains report cards, credit history and completed diploma requirements, and other material relevant to the education of the student. The OSR follows the student through school and remains at the final Ontario school attended. The Ontario Education Act and Freedom of Information legislation protect these records.
An official record of academic achievement at a secondary school in Ontario.
A Pathways program which allows students to gain experience and training in apprenticeship occupations through Co-operative Education.
Pathways initiatives provide a wide range of course types, programs and learning opportunities to prepare students for success in secondary school and in their chosen post-secondary destination.
This is a specific course students must successfully complete before taking another course at the next grade level.
A range of responses and consequences when a student’s actions are contrary to the Code of Conduct.
The school year is divided into two semesters. A student will generally take 4 courses in each semester.
School Councils advise principals and, where appropriate, the school board on issues affecting the education programs and the operation of individual schools. Their membership reflects both the school and the community and includes parents and guardians of students, the principal, a teacher, a student representative (secondary school councils), a non-teaching school staff member as well as members from the community at large. Parents must make up the majority of council members
A Pathways program that allows students to focus their learning on a career path that matches their skills and interests. SHSM programs include a compulsory bundle of eight to twelve Grade 11 and 12 courses, industry certification/training and experiential learning from the chosen sector.
Secondary schools have staff and programs in place to support and improve student learning.
A timetable outlines the course, time, room number, lunch period, teacher and semester in which students will take all of their courses.